Muscat Made in Alsace

Crisp, dry, delicately aromatic and distinctly grapey, Muscat is the classic Alsatian spring aperitif. In restaurants all around our region at this time of year, un verre de Muscat is regularly proffered as an appetite sharpener – très typique and lots more fun than the conventional choices like Champagne or Crémant d’Alsace.

Amongst all the (many and varied) wines of Alsace, Muscat is probably the least known – and the most surprising – of them all. Its relative obscurity is explained by the fact that there’s just so little of it. Of the total vineyard area in Alsace, Muscat accounts for just 362 hectares (900 acres), or a little over 2 percent of all plantings. Compare this with Riesling (3376 hectares, 8300 acres or 22 percent) and you get the picture. There’s just not enough of this wonderful wine to go round.

Why such tiny quantities? Mainly because Muscat is famously difficult to grow. I reckon that if grapes were people, Riesling might be a nicely brought-up young chap, mature beyond his years, a touch preppy, a sure hit with mothers-in-law. Muscat, by contrast, would be the temperamental teenager – every parent’s nightmare. She’s moody, susceptible to the slightest rebuff and always ready to flounce out in a huff, in a word: complicated. Continue reading “Muscat Made in Alsace”

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